Sunday, February 23, 2014
theparisreview:

the mountain’s promiscuous any cloud can take him any sun have him it’s all good today’s assent and tomorrow’s
—Maureen N. McLane, from “All Good.”Art credit Laura Sanders.

theparisreview:

the mountain’s 
promiscuous 
any cloud can take him 
any sun have him 
it’s all good 
today’s assent 
and tomorrow’s

Maureen N. McLane, from “All Good.”
Art credit Laura Sanders.

Tuesday, February 11, 2014
slaughterhouse90210:

“It seemed important to convey that I understood. Isn’t that what intimacy so often is? Supposing you understand, conveying that you do, because you feel in theory that you could understand, and you want to, and yet secretly you don’t?” —Rachel Kushner, The Flamethrowers

slaughterhouse90210:

“It seemed important to convey that I understood. Isn’t that what intimacy so often is? Supposing you understand, conveying that you do, because you feel in theory that you could understand, and you want to, and yet secretly you don’t?”
—Rachel Kushner, The Flamethrowers

Thursday, October 10, 2013

MUNRO: Reading was my life really until I was thirty. I was living in books. The writers of the American South were the first writers who really moved me because they showed me that you could write about small towns, rural people, and that kind of life I knew very well. But the thing about the Southern writers that interested me, without my being really aware of it, was that all the Southern writers whom I really loved were women. I didn’t really like Faulkner that much. I loved Eudora Welty, Flannery O’Connor, Katherine Ann Porter, Carson McCullers. There was a feeling that women could write about the freakish, the marginal.

INTERVIEWER: Which you’ve always done as well.

MUNRO: Yes. I came to feel that was our territory, whereas the mainstream big novel about real life was men’s territory. I don’t know how I got that feeling of being on the margins, it wasn’t that I was pushed there. Maybe it was because I grew up on a margin. I knew there was something about the great writers I felt shut out from, but I didn’t know quite what it was. I was terribly disturbed when I first read D. H. Lawrence. I was often disturbed by writers’ views of female sexuality.

INTERVIEWER: Can you put your finger on what it was that disturbed you?

MUNRO: It was: how I can be a writer when I’m the object of other writers?

Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 137, Alice Munro (via thelifeguardlibrarian)
Monday, May 13, 2013

Notes on a Weekend

*Photo taken by me in Prospect Park on 5/11/2013

It was supposed to rain all day on Saturday. I love making plans, and as such, made a ton of plans for us that involved staying safely indoors. But, by some stroke of luck, Saturday turned out to be really beautiful. It was the second warm day in a row, and something about that made me finally feel like spring was making its way towards Brooklyn. We spent part of the afternoon walking around Prospect Park and I got so excited scheming up summer plans. A few thoughts!

1.       New York in best in the summer, but sometimes the season ends and I realize I didn’t do one of the handful of things that happen only during this season. This year, I plan to spend an hour adding to my calendar all of the Prospect Park shows, Brooklyn Bridge Park movies, and other outdoor events I want to attend. I’m guessing I will only make it to about half of the things that are on my calendar but I like the idea of realizing that a free night nicely coincides with seeing a show in the park. I suggest you do the same! A few links to get you started:

·         http://bricartsmedia.org/performing-arts/celebrate-brooklyn

·         http://rooftopfilms.com/

·         http://www.brooklyncyclones.com/tickets/schedule/

·         http://www.govisland.com/html/visit/calendar.shtml

2.       When T and I were wandering in the park I remembered how when my brothers visited last year we played Frisbee golf in the park one night. I first learned to play in college, where we would make up our own course as we walked around the campus. All you need to play is one Frisbee per person/team. The players/teams take turns picking the “hole” (ie: a tree or a streetlamp) and setting the par (ie: 3 throws to hit the lamppost). You keep score the same way you do in golf, by keeping track of how many points based on going under or over par. It’s a nice way to stretch your legs after spending the day in the office, but since it is a pretty low intensity sport you won’t mind being out in the summer heat.

3.       I get up really early on the weekend, sometimes even earlier than I get up for work. I love the idea that the whole day is mine and that I can spend it doing whatever I want. I can normally be found at the Target on Atlantic Ave around 8am most weekends. Mostly because I think I may have a slight Target addiction, but also because no one else is there and I can browse everything in peace. I found this great jug and can’t wait to break it out for summer picnics in the park. On Wednesday I’ll share a post about what summer drinks I plan to make in the pitcher, as well as featuring some picnic supplies we picked up recently in the neighborhood.

Thursday, April 11, 2013

noraleah:

“A truly MINDBLOWING lesson on the origin of American Southern accents.” (via bestrooftalkever:doctorbeifong)

image

Y’all never heard that certain Southern accents are closest to what Shakespearean English actually sounded like?

Y’all better learn.

PS: I tried my damndest to find the source/genius mimic behind this audio but I cannot. Damn you, tumblr. Show some respect.

(Source: ask-changeling-lyra-open)

Tuesday, March 26, 2013
colchrishadfield:

Richmond, capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia. A vital crossroads for so much American history. 

hometown! 

colchrishadfield:

Richmond, capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia. A vital crossroads for so much American history.

hometown! 

Friday, November 2, 2012
theparisreview:

M. Matisse, I offer you this brief poemOut of love for you,And I offer it for the sakeOf the sanity of places I have wandered in,And I offer it for the sake of whateverBeauty and heartbreak I can imagine.James Wright, from “The Last Day in Paris”Art Credit Eleanor Davis and Katherine Guillen via Booooooom

Lovely.

theparisreview:

M. Matisse, I offer you this brief poem
Out of love for you,
And I offer it for the sake
Of the sanity of places I have wandered in,
And I offer it for the sake of whatever
Beauty and heartbreak I can imagine.

James Wright, from “The Last Day in Paris”
Art Credit Eleanor Davis and Katherine Guillen via Booooooom

Lovely.

Saturday, July 21, 2012
nypl:

Happy birthday to legendary writer Ernest Hemingway … and happy Caturday to you! The author of classics such as “The Old Man And The Sea” and “A Farewell To Arms” was a known cat fanatic, who once said “One cat just leads to another.” The photo above from the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum shows Hemingway hanging with one of his cats in his home in Cuba (we have Hemingway photos, too, but alas, not with his kitties). The Hemingway Home and Museum in Key West is also known for its cats, which roam the premises freely and are descendents of Hemingway’s six-toed cat Snowball. There’s even a book called “Hemingway’s Cats,” which we have in our research collection. We also have plenty of books written by him, so check one out in his honor! Happy Caturday, and happy birthday, Hemingway!

Reminder to myself: Read the new edition of A Farewell to Arms

nypl:

Happy birthday to legendary writer Ernest Hemingway … and happy Caturday to you! The author of classics such as “The Old Man And The Sea” and “A Farewell To Arms” was a known cat fanatic, who once said “One cat just leads to another.” The photo above from the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum shows Hemingway hanging with one of his cats in his home in Cuba (we have Hemingway photos, too, but alas, not with his kitties). The Hemingway Home and Museum in Key West is also known for its cats, which roam the premises freely and are descendents of Hemingway’s six-toed cat Snowball. There’s even a book called “Hemingway’s Cats,” which we have in our research collection. We also have plenty of books written by him, so check one out in his honor! Happy Caturday, and happy birthday, Hemingway!

Reminder to myself: Read the new edition of A Farewell to Arms

Friday, July 6, 2012
July came on with that breathless, brilliant heat which makes the plains of Kansas and Nebraska the best corn country in the world. It seemed as if we could hear the corn growing in the night; under the stars one caught a faint crackling in the dewy, heavy-odoured corn fields where the feathered stalks stood so juicy and green. My Ántonia by Nebraska author Willa Cather (via netnewsnebraska)

I had forgotten that I picked this book up at a sale this past winter. Seems like a good time to finally read it.

vintageanchor:

“This is how a book should be read, how a body should be loved, how a life lived.”
—Cheryl Strayed

I am all about worn out/well loved books. 

vintageanchor:

“This is how a book should be read, how a body should be loved, how a life lived.”

—Cheryl Strayed

I am all about worn out/well loved books. 

(Source: vintageanchorbooks)